Author Archives: briandrayton

SEL #3: Some review studies

With the new year under way, I return to my series on Social and Emotional Learning, which is featuring widely in the edublogosphere as well as in policy. It might be good to start off by reminding the unwary reader … Continue reading

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The year in review, as seen by…

I am taking a short break from my Social-Emotional Learning series, to bring to your attention several year-end lists which you might find provocative, informative, or both. In any case, I can attest that following even a portion of the … Continue reading

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Social and Emotional Learning #2: Something new under the sun?

In our amnesiac society, it is not surprising that inventive, inquisitive, and engaged people might re-invent the wheel. (Realistically, most things are new to us — that is, while someone may know a lot about a lot of things, there’s … Continue reading

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Social-emotional learning: Preamble

“Character” has always been one concern of education, at least of K-12 education (after that, it’s called “ethics,” or “morals,” maybe). Sometimes, conventional wisdom suggests that it’s really the parent’s responsibility, and not, say, the physics teacher’s. Sometimes, character formation … Continue reading

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The manufacture of disbelief and the challenge of science education

STEM teachers out there are probably very well aware of the current sustained attempts across the country to undermine the credibility of science. The “wedge issues” tend to be those that relate to issues of identity and cultural complacency — … Continue reading

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Buzzwords: Programming teaches you how to think

A widely circulated video from Code.org opens with a quotation from Steve Jobs:”Everyone should learn to program a computer.. programming teaches you how to think.”    There is a tidal wave of rhetoric surging across the educational landscape advocating programming, … Continue reading

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Neuromyths and research for teachers and learners

I recently returned to a blog that I have not visited for some months, Daniel Willingham’s Science and education blog.  Willingham is a cognitive scientist whose views on learning and teaching are always worth hearing, because he generally draws from (and … Continue reading

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Education and economics: seeing a little daylight between them

I am not the only one who has noticed, with sorrow, the relentless intensity with which education policy is distorted (and has been for decades) by the assertion that education holds the key to American economic well-being, and that therefore … Continue reading

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Buzzwords: The Zone of Proximal Development

I have been reading lots of reports and blog posts about personalization and related ideas.  There is an encouraging diversity of opinions about what “personalized” or “comptence” or “mastery” might mean, and how they (it) should look in the classroom. … Continue reading

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Teacher professionalism and saving the phenomena

In her Answer Sheet education blog in the Washington post, Valerie Strauss has made a practice of bringing in many voices to enrich conversations about a wide range of education topics.  I find that a recent column relates to my … Continue reading

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